Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellow Genko Genov

Research Fellow – Facts

Dr. Genko Genev, Fellow of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation at TU Darmstadt. Image: Sandra Junker
Dr. Genko Genov. Photo: Sandra Junker

Name: Dr. Genko Genov

Age: 35

Area of research:
Quantum physics, specifically quantum memories in doped solids, coherent light-matter interactions, composite pulses.

Name of my University / Research Institute: Department of Physics, Sofia University, Bulgaria

Research period at the TU Darmstadt:
June 2015 to May 2017

 

Questionnaire to the Research Fellow

My field of research is fascinating. To laymen I would explain it in the following comprehensible manner:
We all use computers, smartphones, and communicate over the internet. Nowadays, most of these are based on technologies that use electrons, but they will reach their physical limits soon. Technologies based on quantum computation with optical bits of information are a promising alternative, but they require appropriate quantum memories. One of the main problems for such quantum memories is decoherence, i.e., unwanted interaction between a quantum bit and its environment, which introduces errors in the memory. I work to design new techniques to avoid or reduce this problem, e.g., by applying sequences of pulses that prevent the quantum bits to be affected by the environment.

My most important success in research to date is:
designing universal sequences of pulses that compensate any error in a pulse as long as it can be repeated (we just need to add something called a phase to each of the pulses)

I’ve chosen the TU Darmstadt because…
the Nonlinear Optics/Quantum Optics group of Prof. Halfmann. It is one of the best experimental groups in the world in quantum memories for light in solid-state materials such as rare-earth ions doped into dielectric crystals. The working environment in the group is great, and it is also very beneficial for me as a theorist to work with such an experimental group.

Prof. Dr. Thomas Halfmann (right) with Dr. Genko Genov. Photo: Sandra Junker
Prof. Dr. Thomas Halfmann (right) with Dr. Genko Genov. Photo: Sandra Junker

If I were a student today, I would read more books outside the curriculum, learn more mathematics, and talk more to my professors.

The perfect balance to a stressful working day is any outdoor activity (running, riding a bicycle, hiking), dancing, and a conversation with friends in the park.

With the help of my host in Darmstadt I would like to make the most efficient and robust quantum memory in doped solids.

 

Questionnaire for the host

Prof. Dr. Thomas Halfmann. Photo: Sandra Junker
Prof. Dr. Thomas Halfmann. Photo: Sandra Junker

Guest of: Prof. Dr. Thomas Halfmann

Department: Physics

You appreciate in your guest / your guest favourably impressed you by Dr. Genov is a clever, highly motivated, internationally experienced young scientist, always eager to learn about new topics, and cooperate (as a theoretican) with us experimentalists at Darmstadt.

You, your team and the TU Darmstadt benefit from your guest’s…
Genko is an expert in theoretical treatment of light-matter interactions. Already in previous work we jointly developed new, powerful protocols for optical data storage, which offer fascinating properties to stop and store light pulses in atoms as memories. This may be the basic component of any future quantum computer.